June is for Allium, Peony, Iris and Hawthorn! And the last Cherry bloom.

Cherry Tree the beginning of June.

Cherry Tree the beginning of June.

The nice thing about going away … is coming home.  Missing two weeks of garden growth at the end of May and beginning of June is like missing a marathon!  So much is happening.

Cherry tree in early June.

Cherry tree in early June.

I quickly snapped away with my camera to capture the very last blooms from our cherry trees.  I was lucky to have a pretty sky too!

Cherry tree in early June.

Cherry tree in early June.

Pink is my favorite color, and I love to see it in the garden.  Our Hawthorn trees had a bit of pink in them this year.  They were lovely all in white bloom, with sprays of pink.

Hawthorn in full bloom.

Hawthorn in full bloom.

Sprays of pink in the Hawthorn blooms.

Sprays of pink in the Hawthorn blooms.

It’s funny how everything looks better in sunshine, but with too much sunshine everything looks bleached!  I won’t be complaining (ever!) about the sun, but I’ll have to work a bit harder trying to get the pictures right.

Allium posing in front of the Hawthorn trees.

Allium posing in front of the Hawthorn trees.

We were quite lucky with our Allium this year.  The wind has held off for the most part, and I’ve enjoyed their long showy splendor for a few weeks now.  Last year they were knocked completely over in their first week of blooming.  This one garden is transforming into a purple garden!  I think the Allium and Erysimum go really well together.

Erysimum Bowles' Mauve

Erysimum Bowles’ Mauve

My Erysimum (Bowles’ Mauve) plant is really showing off now.  It has a great spread, and is simply beautiful. It seems quite happy.

Another view of the purple garden.

Another view of the purple garden.

On the right of the purple garden I have a globe artichoke plant (Cynara Scolymus). You can just see the wire support.  I’m not sure how this is going to go, but I’m always hopeful!

Blue Geranium.

Blue Geranium.  This plant is in my “wait until I have a space” garden.  I will be moving it to my new purple garden as I love the color.  I might just  switch it with the pink Geranium I currently have there.  Or I might put  both there!

Tree Paeonia Renkaku.

Tree Paeonia Renkaku.

My tree peony had one flower this year.  It was truly a lovely flower, though!  It arrived last year as an eight inch tall stem. As in one stem!  It must be quite hardy, as it survived the winter, grew, and produced such a lovely flower.   It was worth the wait.

Tree Paeonia Renkaku

Tree Paeonia Renkaku.

It is rather delicate looking, but I think it is quite hardy!

Tree Paeonia Renkaku.

Tree Paeonia Renkaku.

My regular peony plants didn’t do too badly either!

Peony.

Peony.

Peony.

Peony.

Peony.

Peony.

Dutch Iris Blue Magic.

Dutch Iris Blue Magic.  I was trying to capture the Iris without having to go over the fence.  So I tried looking down on it.  I like the different look it gave!

Dutch Iris Blue Magic.

Dutch Iris Blue Magic.

As for fruits and vegetables, I’m pleased with the progress so far.  I know for some people growing vegetables and fruit comes so easily.  But it has been quite a learning process for me!  We planted too many strawberry plants last year, and they were too close to one another.  The netting was cumbersome to remove, which was problematic.  This year, I am hopeful (always!) that we’ll get to enjoy the fruit.  It looks beautiful now!

Strawberry plants.

Strawberry plants.

Strawberry plants.

Strawberry plants.

We added in some stepping stones into the strawberry beds, and a wee bunny.  I’m sure he’ll definitely scare any birds away…

The fruit orchard view in June.

The fruit orchard view in June.

Vegetable beds in June.

Vegetable beds in June.

Our vegetable beds are filling in!  We have newly planted main crop potatoes on the right. On the left we have fencing for our pea plants.  In between the pea plants, some potatoes have decided to grow from last year’s crop. I’m really not sure what to do with them!  I’ll probably earth them up when we do the main crop of potatoes, and see how they turn out.

Sarpo Mira Main Crop potatoes.

Sarpo Mira Main Crop potatoes.

We love beets!  But this is the second year now that only a few beet plants have come up.  I’ve tried a second planting, so maybe we’ll still get some more. (will I mention that hopeful word again???)

Organic Golden Detroit  Beetroot (beets).

Organic Golden Detroit Beetroot (beets).

My family thought we had too much chard last year, so I’ve scaled back on it this year.  I’m hoping to still keep it in our summer menu, but not too much that the family go running when they see it!

Rainbow chard.

Rainbow chard.

Swede (turnips).

Swede (turnips).

Now here is a vegetable that loves to grow in my garden – Swede!  Every single seed that I have planted has germinated.  I’ve thinned them out and passed the extras on to my neighbor James.  Thankfully, my family like swede. Good thing, too, as we’ll be having it a lot this winter!

Organic Yellowstone carrots.

Organic Yellowstone carrots.

My carrots are making themselves seen.

Cristo garlic.

Cristo garlic.

It turns out that most gardeners plant their garlic in the fall/winter and harvest in the summer.  I seem to have it a bit off.  This fall I’ll see if I can manage to get some in the ground.  It might be nice to have something growing in the winter.

A view of the back field.

A view of the back field.

This last picture was taken just a couple of weeks before the veggie pictures above.  So much growth in so little time!  You can just see the white from the Hawthorn trees lining the field.  It’s such a lovely sight (and site!).

I hope your garden is full of growth and beauty!

Dana

A wee stone wall at the front gate garden.

It is sunny today!  And even somewhat warm (14 degrees Celsius, 57 degrees Fahrenheit) so out in the garden is where I was all morning.  I came across some really nice stones in one of our local fields recently.  The owner had a laugh when I asked, but he agreed to let me have as many stones as I’d like, so long as I didn’t disrupt his potato crop.  That was fine by me!  The kids and I hauled a bunch of stones  back to our place. There are big ones, small ones, flat and rounded ones.   I’m not exactly sure what I’ll be doing with them, but for starters I’m using some to finish off the front garden at our gates.  I think it’s a stretch to call it a wall, but for lack of a better name, that is what I’m calling it!

There are two hostas in the front garden by the gate, and two newly planted climbing roses (Zephirine Drouhin 1868).  My hopes are that the roses will climb along the fence (we’ll see!).  I’ve put down wet newspapers to keep down any grass,  and then some topsoil.   I think by Fall I’ll have some more ideas of what I’ll want to plant here.

I also took some more pictures of life around the garden.  My Angelique tulips are really in full bloom now, and look so much nicer in sunlight!  The cherry tree, and maple tree are showing their beauty.  I wasn’t sure how my new Tree Peony would do when we planted it as there was very little of a root system on it. But it seems to have taken hold and is growing.   I didn’t take a picture of our Japanese Maple because it is completely wind destroyed!  We will be looking for a new location for that very soon.  My purple anemone have to be one of my favorite flowers this year  with their amazing color! (called Mr. Fokker).

There are just two days left to my swimming course this weekend, and then I can work a lot harder in the garden!

I hope you are able to spend some time outside in the sunshine!

Dana

The wee wall, hosta, and climbing rose plant.

Cherry blossom.

Maple leaves.

Tree Peony.

Double late Angelique tulips.

Mr. Fokker Anemone.