In a Vase on Monday: Roses by Candlelight

Climbing roses, and a couple of stray roses from the "rose garden"

Climbing roses, and a couple of stray roses from the “rose garden”

I am simply in the spirit!  I thought for sure I would have to skip my “In a Vase on Monday” post as I hadn’t prepared anything this weekend.  To top it off, when I arrived home tonight it was pouring rain and pitch dark!  But I had an idea in my head so I really wanted to follow through with it.

what a difference using a flash makes...

What a difference using the flash makes on colouring.  I have to say I really prefer these pictures with no flash.

Roses up close

Roses up close

The roses are in an oasis in a red glass dessert bowl. My mother gave me a set of large and small glasses and dessert bowls all in a beautiful deep red, perhaps more of a burgundy colour.  Why the glasses match the dessert bowls is a bit of a mystery, but they do look pretty together!

Christmas tree candle in the background

Christmas tree candle in the background

You can still see some raindrops on the flowers!  It was *really* raining when I cut them!

a little candle light to make things pretty

a little candle light to make things pretty

I was definitely in the mindset of Christmas with my white tree candle and red bowls.  I had to transform these pretty pinks into holiday spirit!

Nearing the end of the roses...

Nearing the end of the roses…

The climbing roses are amazing and still have quite a few clusters of buds.  I tried to cut the ones that were nearing the end, as it is so nice to see them outside when most everything else is “finished”.

Softer look without the flash

Softer look without the flash

Oh my goodness I am so glad I went outside and got drenched! The arrangement is only 7 inches tall and about 7 inches wide and just adorable (so says the very humble arranger, ahem.).

too many pictures?

too many pictures?

You can join Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for this very fun meme “In a Vase on Monday” (http://ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com/2014/12/01/in-a-vase-on-monday-wintersweet/ )  as a challenge to find plant material in your garden at all months of the year!

I hope you are also ‘in the spirit’!

In peace,
Dana

Roses by Candlelight

Roses by Candlelight

A garden no matter how small…

Floribunda Rose Queen Elizabeth

Floribunda Rose Queen Elizabeth

I was away from my country living today, and was in and around Dublin for the day. Being one to always be on the lookout for flowers and gardens, it struck me how many home gardens I saw. Gardens in very, very small spaces and with beautiful flowers!  It was clear that no matter the size or location, the gardens were well tended and cared for; all throughout the Dublin area.  The predominant flower was definitely roses.  There wasn’t one color in particular that stood out, but rather, every color was represented.  It was such a treat to see!  Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to take any pictures (and you know I would have if I could have!).

Floribunda Rose Burgundy Ice

Floribunda Rose Burgundy Ice

This evening my son had a Gaelic football match in a nearby village.  I think it would be safe to say that it was “in the country”.  I was no less impressed on our drive there with the fantastic gardens in the front yards of houses.  It is lovely how attentive people are to their gardens.  I really like getting glimpses into different gardens, ideas, and flowers, especially when I’m not driving! 🙂

Hybrid Tea Rose Pink Peace

Hybrid Tea Rose Pink Peace

What a lovely day I’ve had. It was nice to really appreciate all that was around me.  I still get moments of “wow, I live in Ireland”!

Rosa Jacques Cartier (1868)

Rosa Jacques Cartier (1868)

ground cover flowers in my rose garden

ground cover flowers in my rose garden

But mostly, I get feelings of “wow, I really like my garden”…

A view of the rose garden

A view of the rose garden

It is a work in progress. But it is all a labor of love.

 

A glimpse of the roses at our front gate

A glimpse of the roses at our front gate

I hope there is a beautiful garden near you to make you smile!  Or at least, I hope a glimpse into my garden will make you smile 🙂

Happy Summer!

Dana

 

 

A final farewell to summertime flowers

Echinacea Salsa Red

Echinacea Salsa Red

It really was such a lovely summer.  I have so many pictures that I’ve taken that I want to share!  There have been a few new additions to the garden.  The Salsa Red Echinacea is one of my favorites!  A red cone flower, it has been blooming since I bought it in late summer.  I have it near my Black eyed Susan flowers.

Black eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)

Black eyed Susan (Rudbeckia) in evening sunlight.

Butterfly enjoying the Black eyed Susan

Butterfly enjoying the Black eyed Susan

Paniculata hydrangea

Paniculata hydrangea

The Paniculata hydrangea is another new addition to my garden and another one of my favorites! 🙂  I bought it late in the season while it was still mostly white. But as it ages, it turns pink, and mine turned quite pink in the end.  It is just about ready for me to give it a really good pruning. I’d like to give it a nicer shape for next year as it is quite gangly at the moment.  But the blooms were so lovely and delicate!

Paniculata hydrangea

Paniculata hydrangea – reminds me of lace.

Paniculata hydrangea

Paniculata hydrangea

The Paniculata hydrangea likes lots of sun.  Other varieties of hydrangea don’t require as much sunlight as this one does.  It can grow to about 8 to 10 feet tall and wide, but can be kept at the size you want with regular pruning.  Pruning can be done at any time of year as it does not affect the blooms like other varieties of hydrangeas.  I’m excited to see how this one does in our sunny front yard!

End of season Paniculata hydrangea with its new pink color.

End of season Paniculata hydrangea with its new pink color.

Speaking of pink!  My roses are going for another round of showing off!  We had really bad black spot this year, and I was away when it should have been looked after.  I am still trying to find organic ways to prevent/treat black spot. (Please let me know if you’ve found something that works!)  I’ll be growing something from the onion family in the rose garden next year. But I think I’ll need to find some kind of spray, too, as the conditions for black spot are simply too perfect here.  In the meantime, I’m enjoying the (rose) show!

Floribunda rose Queen Elizabeth (fragrant) with about a million flower buds!

Floribunda rose Queen Elizabeth (fragrant) with about a million flower buds!

Floribunda rose Burgundy Ice

Floribunda rose Burgundy Ice

Floribunda rose Burgundy Ice

Floribunda rose Burgundy Ice

Hybrid tea rose Pink Peace (fragrant)Hybrid tea rose Pink Peace (fragrant)

A tiny stemmed rose bouquet.

A tiny stemmed rose bouquet.

Dahlia.

Dahlia

I’ve planted a yellow Dahlia next to my Asters which have a bright yellow center, or at least they will when they finally bloom later in the fall.  This little plant is very cheerful right now!

Dahlia

Dahlia

This redish Dahlia plant I received at the same time as the yellow one.  It seems to be much happier in its location as the plant size more than doubled in a very short amount of time!

A very happy Dahlia plant.

A very happy Dahlia plant covered in blooms.

Blue hydrangea

Blue hydrangea

Sure it wouldn’t be summer without a  blue hydrangea picture! This plant is growing just down the road from me at my neighbor Jerry’s house.  I couldn’t resist taking a picture of it, as the color is so lovely!

Pink hydrangea

Pink hydrangea

Things in my yard tend to grow pink!  This hydrangea is in my yard.  That is ok with me.

Autumn Joy sedum

Autumn Joy sedum

My Autumn Joy sedum is turning a pretty shade of pink.  The butterflies like it too!  I cut this plant down early in the season so that it wouldn’t be so leggy.  That worked great and I think it’s now neater.

Old fashioned geranium

Old fashioned geranium

Geranium on a foggy morning.

Geranium on a foggy morning.

Marigold

Marigold

A snapshot of a perfect summer day ... already behind us.

A snapshot of a perfect summer day … already a distant memory.

I love sharing my pictures of flowers with you!  I hope you’ve enjoyed the look back on summer.  I next have to show you a look back on the vegetables from the summer!

Happy end of summer 🙂
Dana

End of June Roses & Poppies, but wait! Asparagus & Brussels Sprouts too!

Rosa Jacques Cartier (1868).

Rosa Jacques Cartier (1868).

Now that is a picture to get me started! I love roses.  Especially pink ones, but really any color makes me smile.  These just fill the little rose garden with color!The rose garden.

The rose garden.

This has been a very good season for black spot, unfortunately.  I was away this spring, when I think I should have been tending the roses to prevent black spot.  I still have not found an organic method, which annoys me.  This is my garden story as I grow and learn, black spots and all.  I think it would be quite misleading to leave out the rough patches that might be involved in gardening.  While I’m at my confession, I’ll add that I didn’t prune my roses this year (yikes!).  I just was completely unsure of how to go about it and procrastinated too long.  Then it was too late!

Burgundy Ice Floribunda Rose.

Burgundy Ice Floribunda Rose.

Burgundy Ice Floribunda rose.

Burgundy Ice Floribunda rose.

I think pruning them is helpful to prevent black spot (gives better air circulation).  I have been cutting away as much of the black spot as I can manage.  I was really surprised this week when a bunch of roses bloomed – I thought they were too far gone!  The worst affected were the Rosa Jacques Cartier (1868), but they weren’t the only ones.

Rosa Jacques Cartier (1868).

Rosa Jacques Cartier (1868).

Rosa Jacques Cartier (1868).

Rosa Jacques Cartier (1868). This rose is incredibly fragrant.  The walkway to the front door smells beautiful!  How lucky to be able to plant them there!

Zephirine Drouhin (1868).

Zephirine Drouhin (1868). In this picture you can see the black spots on some of the leaves. (I must get out there and cut those off!) These roses are at my front gate.

Zephirine Drouhin (1868).

Zephirine Drouhin (1868).

I need some more color in my rose garden. 🙂  There must be some more varied shades of pink out there!

Silver Anniversary Hybrid Tea Rose.

Silver Anniversary Hybrid Tea rose.

Iceberg Floribunda rose.

Iceberg Floribunda rose.

I do like the white roses, too, though.  I would really like to get a better handle on this black spot situation…

Poppies on the other hand, have no problems like black spot.  My only problem with them is their falling over!

Poppies.

Poppies.

The center of that big mess of greens holds a very large bunch of fallen-over poppies!  I’ve tried to pull them up. I’m not sure yet if it is going to work.  I will (humbly?) point out that the fence has been painted again this year.  My daughter was a big help with this job.  I have to say that I enjoyed doing it.  I really like how it brightens things up!

A "relaxed look" garden.

A “relaxed look” garden.

I like seeing the bright red flowers when I’m in the yard. The red really jumps out, even from a distance.  It is a very relaxed looking garden, nothing formal here!  The daisies are just about ready to bloom next to the never ending poppies.

Poppies.

Poppies.

A very wrinkled looking poppy!

A very wrinkled looking poppy!

As for some of the vegetables in the garden, things are growing!  We started planting asparagus two years ago.  That means that next year we’ll be able to actually eat some!  There really weren’t too many stalks, so this year we planted a full bed of different varieties.  Through some research we learned that asparagus like mushroom compost.  If our experience is anything to go by, this is certainly the case! What an amazing amount of growth we’ve seen this year.

A look at the growing asparagus.

A look at the growing asparagus.

Just about every crown we planted has grown.  These are one year old crowns.  This is much, much nicer looking than the few crowns that had been limping along the past two seasons.  I’m giving full credit to the mushroom compost we used this year.  We are really hopeful for a good crop next year!

Asparagus (the first year planting 1 year old crowns).

Asparagus (the first year planting 1 year old crowns).

Asparagus planted 2 years ago, peeking through.

Asparagus planted 2 years ago, peeking through.

That purple guy was planted two years ago.  I cut the stalk down last week because it was too tall and was falling over.  I think this would actually be ready for eating – if it was a one year old crown when planted.  It’s a bit funny just having one spear though!

Baby asparagus!

Baby asparagus!

You can really see the difference in thickness of these and the purple guy.  My soil looks really dry.  It isn’t actually, but we get a lot of wind which dries the top layer (quickly!).

Brussels Sprouts.

Brussels Sprouts.

This year we are trying Brussels Sprouts!  My blogging friend Claire over at Promenade Plantings http://promenadeplantings.com/2013/04/03/all-about-brussels/ gave some really helpful hints on getting started with sprouts.  I’m not sure if we started early enough, but my fingers are crossed!  The main thing was to really pack down the earth before planting.  I wish I had a photograph, because my husband and daughter really had fun dancing on the bed to prepare it!  It was well packed down to say the least! 🙂

Brussels Sprouts.

Brussels Sprouts.

The next big job we had was to take off any critters (worms). We, actually my girls did this job, took off a bunch of worms this week.  So now I’m keeping a close eye on the plants.  Funny enough, the pigeons haven’t eaten the leaves, which they apparently like to do.  I’m counting my lucky stars, because there are so many pigeons around here!

Brussels Sprouts.

Brussels Sprouts.

We’ll see how it goes.  Nothing ventured, nothing gained! Have you tried anything new in the garden this year?

Dana

Too pretty to leave behind!

Too pretty to leave behind!

The garden in November.

Orange Pumpkins!

Orange Pumpkins!

November?! Really?  I hope you won’t have forgotten me, as it’s been too long since I last posted!  I’ve missed you. 🙂  Lately I’ve been wearing two of my many different hats; Mom of Swimmers hat, and Mom of Irish Dancers hat.  We’ve all been working really hard!  After two months into the full swimming schedule our girls improved all of their racing times at the first swim gala (meet) a couple of weeks ago.  That’s a great way to start the season.   Our three Irish dancers have been working since the summer towards the Ulster Championship Feis, which took place this past week in Donegal . It’s harder for the littlest one to keep that focus for so long, but she did well. (She’s finally making progress on keeping those feet turned out!)   My kids also dance on teams, and it is just fantastic to watch as they keep their straight lines and perfect formations while dancing around the stage!  We are so proud of them.  They all danced their best, which is all we could ask for. It is rewarding to see the kids really putting their all into their activities and to watch them improve through their efforts.  Sometimes it takes more work than other times, but thankfully we’re all going in the right direction!

As for my Mom in the Garden hat, I too, have been putting in some “hard work”.  It’s called weeding!  The fence line is pretty much in constant need of clearing. I really like how it looks after I get a section finished.  It’s nothing glamorous, not really even picture worthy, but if it isn’t maintained it sure is noticeable! If you know me, you know that I’d rather spend a week weeding than even think about using chemicals.   I just think it is better for the environment and better for us.  The hard work is worth it, and it is great being outside.

Anyone curious about my pumpkins?  I had very green pumpkins when I cut them off of their vines in early October.  https://mominthegarden.wordpress.com/2012/10/09/the-race-is-on-green-or-orange-pumpkins-for-halloween/ I brought them inside, and placed them in sunny locations.  I was completely skeptical that they’d ever turn orange, they were *really* green,  but turn orange they did!  Little by little, the jack-o-lantern pumpkins completely changed color.  My cooking pumpkins were much slower to change, and have more of a marbled look.  Doesn’t matter, I am looking forward to making some pumpkin soup!

Pumpkin soup, and lovely orange pumpkins to decorate with.  Yes, that will be perfect for Thanksgiving in a few weeks.  No rushing into things for me!!!

Happy November 🙂

Dana

Beech hedging changing color  in October.

Beech hedging changing color in October.

Weeding along the fence of beech hedging.

Weeding along the fence of beech hedging.

A bird party on our house!

A bird party on our house! A little distraction while I was weeding.

Early morning mist on the apple tree and blueberry bush.

Early morning mist on the apple tree and blueberry bushes.

My favorite fall picture (so far!).

My favorite fall picture (so far!).

Calendula (apricot twist) still going strong!

Calendula (apricot twist) still going strong!

Burgundy Ice Floribunda Rose in October.

Burgundy Ice Floribunda Rose in October.

Roses, Hydrangeas and Poppies for some summertime beauty.

Mom in the garden. That’s me.  Except I haven’t been able to get into my garden very much the past few weeks. This, unfortunately,  is making me quite grumpy!  So I’m simply going to post a bunch of pictures that make me feel like I’m in my garden.  🙂

I hope you like them. And that they make you feel happy too!

Dana

A cluster of my climbing roses (Zephirine Drouhin). I’m so happy with their brightness factor on our fence!

I really liked the lighting on this Zephirine Drouhin Climbing rose.

This is my sister-in-law’s Tiger Rose. I think it is amazing! (and I really *need* to get one!)

What a splash of color this beautiful Tiger Rose adds to a garden!

Evening sunlight softens the color tone of my Burgundy Ice Floribunda Rose.

Evening sunlight on my Iceberg Floribunda Rose. I can’t resist taking pictures in the evening!

Fuchsia is a very popular plant in Ireland. It’s not uncommon to find it growing in hedges in the West. It was introduced to Ireland in the mid-19th century from Chile & Argentina. (This picture was taken in County Mayo).

Is it any surprise that I have a picture of a Hydrangea? I love their high cheerfulness factor!

Yep, another Hydrangea picture…

My Clematis ‘Bagatelle’ (Dorothy Walton). This picture is for my husband 🙂

My poppies on a glorious morning!

A different view of the poppies.

Marigolds to finish the post with.