September Splendor in Sunshine for Six on Saturday

Hello! Welcome to my blog! “What’s been happening in the garden?” you ask? Well that is a great question! 🙂 I’m delighted to report that the garden is looking really well, if I do say so myself. I’m going to sum it up with picking six items to tell you about as I join the Propagator’s meme ‘Six on Saturday’. Feel free to have a look and see what others have picked for their six!

Two pears in tree

1 – We’re going to start with pears. My pear tree has good years and bad years. This year we have two pears. I’m looking at it that at least we have two!

Eustacia Vye rose in September

2 – While I love roses and have quite a few, this one is my favorite at the moment. It is a David Austin rose called Eustacia Vye and while it is pink, it has soft peach undertones. Of course it also has a lovely scent. There is a cluster of roses, which is what I’ve tried to capture here.

Delphinium collage

3 – Delphinium. This delphinium is something I’m quite proud of as I grew it from seed. Of all the plants that I grew from seed this year, I had the least success with the delphinium. I did get two seeds to germinate, though, and had two flowering plants. This is the second one and the biggest by quite a long shot. They are both just in pots, as I wasn’t sure they were going to really make it the whole season! But since they have, in the next couple of weeks I will find a sheltered spot to plant them in, since it is quite windy where we live. I think their color is a lovely addition to the garden.

Vase with black calla lilies

4 – Black calla lilies. I’m currently a bit obsessed with black (or dark purple) flowers. These calla lilies are so pretty. The arrangement in the vase is actually what is left from what was a much bigger arrangement. These guys, bar the roses, lasted quite a while! This arrangement has Himalayan honeysuckle, black calla lilies, cream and pink roses, and Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia).

Asters and view of pumpkins

5 – Asters! I think the pink asters are a perfect contrast to the typical fall colors you’ll find in the garden. If you look closely at the ornamental grass, you will see that I have French braided the grass to keep it from hiding the asters. I think it came out quite well!

The front and back view of the pumpkin arch with squash and pumpkins

6 – The pumpkin arch! Wow, we’re just about there with almost all of the pumpkins turning orange! I’ve taken a picture of the front and back view, lining up a lot of the squash and a few of the pumpkins up front. I am really happy with how it turned out. Aiming to get those pumpkins higher next year! 🙂

Pumpkin arch with apples and flowers

We’ve had some beautiful weather in September. It is so invigorating to have sunny days with a blue sky! It is also nice to have everything in the garden come together. It’s been such a pleasure to work in the garden, as there has always been something in bloom or coming into bloom. Lucky me!

I hope September has been good to you, too.

In Peace,
Dana

Hydrangea Selma’s new life.

I would love to say that I get it right the first time with all of my gardening projects. (Wouldn’t that be great?) But as life would have it, that just isn’t the case.  My husband was laughing at me just the other day, due to his having to move a plant from one location to another.  He’d prefer that I had a more clear vision, one which didn’t involve changing my mind (or the locations of plants!).  I’m still learning, and thankfully, my husband is still digging for me.

I probably have more than a few examples of our learning as we go along, but I’ll just focus on my Hydrangea Selma today.  I figured it was about time for an update.  Back in June, I posted about my Hydrangea Selma, and how it wasn’t doing well.  https://mominthegarden.wordpress.com/2012/06/17/nursing-hydrangea-selma-back-to-health/  I  bought this plant two years ago, and there were lovely pink and white blooms on burgundy leaves.  It was gorgeous.  As it turns out, the soil I planted it in was quite wet with not enough drainage or air, or peat.   My husband dug it up for me, and we added a 60/40 mix of compost/peat to the soil.  I could not believe the change in the plant!  It was immediately happier, filling out over the past few months.  It continued to improve despite the constant attack by slugs this summer.  Nothing deterred those guys.  Every night I’d be out in the garden picking them off.  I won’t mention what I did with them. I’d prefer for you to think of me as a non-violent gardener. 🙂  So here are some pictures of Selma now. I think the foliage is lovely.  I don’t have blooms yet, but I’m really hoping that next season we’ll finally get to enjoy some blooms.

So I’ve learned that all is not necessarily lost if your plant isn’t doing well. It’s worth investigating to find a solution!

Dana

P.S.  On a topic unrelated to Selma, I want to show you some pictures of my front gate garden.   The Asters given to me by my friend Susan are a pretty  “wow” factor!  I love seeing them every time I drive through our gates.  I think the pink climbing roses are a nice backdrop, as I am partial to pink!

June 2012 Hydrangea Selma in a bad way.

June 2012 Hydrangea Selma in a bad way.

October 2012 Hydrangea Selma filling out.

October 2012 Hydrangea Selma filling out.

October 2012 Hydrangea Selma.

October 2012 Hydrangea Selma.

A close up of Hydrangea Selma 2012.

A close up of Hydrangea Selma 2012.

A healthy Hydrangea Selma in 2010.

A healthy Hydrangea Selma in 2010.

A healthy Hydrangea Selma in 2010.

A healthy Hydrangea Selma in 2010.

Asters at the front gate.

Asters at the front gate.

Asters.

Asters.

My Asters earlier in the season, after some rain.

My Asters earlier in the season, after some rain.

The front gate at sunset.

The front gate at sunset.