Roses – adding to life’s beauty

Hello, and welcome! Today’s post is about roses. I certainly have quite a few pictures of roses to show you, but I also want to share how I came to have roses in our garden. I love working with my hands. That covers a lot of areas (!) including gardening, flower arranging, and crafting to name but a few of my hobbies. So when we moved into our home all of those years ago, and the garden was like a blank slate, I was in my glory! Top of the list was to add plants which I could use for flower arranging.

Having cut flowers from the garden is something I’ve always wanted. This goes back to the days in the late 1990s when my sister and I would read Martha Stewart’s Living magazine from cover to cover. Of course the magazine would feature Martha’s home(s) which would always be filled with beautiful cut flowers from her garden(s). My sister’s garden was well ahead of mine in those days. Whenever I’d visit her, my bedroom and guest bathroom would be adorned with flowers. It was always such a lovely touch!

Today, many years later, I still love having cut flowers in our home. It has taken time to build up enough plants that I don’t mind cutting some to bring inside – since there will still be enough to enjoy outside. I hesitate to say I have a favorite flower, because I love all of them. Roses, though, they would have to be at the top of the list. I have two requirements when I buy them for my garden now: they have to be scented and they have to be disease resistant. For this reason, my collection includes many David Austin roses.

I’m still learning. Every year I work on my pruning skills (still not there yet!). I also never used to feed my roses, although their beds are always covered in my compost a couple of times a year. So they haven’t been totally neglected! They should be fed twice a year – once in spring (late March / early April) before the leaves are fully open, and right about now – after the first flush of flowers. Deadheading is something I do on a regular basis, as it promotes new growth.

I’ve lost my focus! Back to why my garden is filled with roses. There are many reasons why I grow roses. They have a very long flowering season – from early June all the way through November in some years! Some colors are excellent for drying, too, often being added to my lavender wreaths. I love their scents which you can enjoy throughout the garden. They also keep their scent even after they dry (did you know that?). And they are a perfect cut flower. Whether your arrangement is all roses, or they are combined with other flowers, they are simply beautiful to bring indoors.

Here are some pictures of my roses from the past number of weeks. I think they benefited from our dry spring. Although most are disease resistant, black spot tends to hit when the rain comes (and at this stage, the rains are with us).

I hope you are well and keeping safe. Thanks for stopping by!

In Peace,
Dana

Full view of rose bed
A view of the main rose bed June 7, 2020. The bed is lined with Boxwood plants which we grew from cuttings from other plants from the garden. They are growing really well! The grass on the other hand, was still desperate for water here.
Harlow Carr
Harlow Carr – David Austin Rose
Teasing Georgia open and orange red  buds
I love the dark orange/red color of the buds on this Teasing Georgia – David Austin Rose, which is pure yellow when completely open.
COLLAGE Teasing Georgia David Austin Roses
Our Teasing Georgia – David Austin rose shrub is next to our ‘Playhouse’, with lavender not yet in bloom in front.
small vase yellow rose
A small vase of David Austin roses, featuring Teasing Georgia.
Princess Anne white roses COLLAGE
Our Princess Anne – David Austin tree rose, which has deep pink flowers, sprouted a stem with white roses! Although they are beautiful, I cut it off as I’d prefer the original color.
Princess Anne Tree rose WHITE offshoot single
Princess Anne – David Austin tree rose – a white off-shoot.
Princess Anne open with buds
Princess Anne – David Austin shrub rose
Boscobel COLLAGE
Boscobel – David Austin roses looking different depending on the light. A salmon colored, sweet smelling rose.
Princess Anne shrub rose flower fully open
Princess Anne – David Austin shrub rose
Princess Anne closed flower
The coloring of the Princess Anne – David Austin shrub rose is simply striking!
James Austin full bloom
Very similar in color to Princess Anne is this James Austin shrub rose.
Olivia Rose David Austin roses full plant
This Olivia Rose – David Austin shrub rose is one of the more established shrubs in the bed.
Olivia Rose Austin roses
Olivia Rose Austin roses
Roses and Poppies in sunlight
Poppies have joined the roses
Vase of Peony flowers, roses and Dutch iris
A vase of Sarah Bernhardt peony, Teasing Georgia – David Austin roses, Dutch Iris and ornamental grass, all from my garden.
Vase of peony flowers roses and iris
Vase of Sarah Bernhardt peony, Teasing Georgia – David Austin roses, Dutch Iris and ornamental grass – all from my garden.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the flower show! Take care! 🙂

6 thoughts on “Roses – adding to life’s beauty

  1. You have to add photography to your list of hobbies, your photos are spectacular. Each and every rose is beautiful, I don’t think I could pick a favorite. I’ve always liked yellow roses and yours are very different. What I found out about the ones that you could buy at a florist was that yellow roses didn’t last as long as other cut roses.

    • Hi Karen, you are very kind! Thank you. I actually had a few more pictures of different roses that didn’t even make the cut for this post! Interesting to know about the yellow roses – I haven’t really noticed a difference, but I’ll pay closer attention now. 🙂

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